Bush Hyrax Heterohyrax brucei

Bush Hyrax
Bush Hyrax
There is one species of Rock Hyrax (the Rock/Cape Hyrax), one Bush Hyrax (sometimes called the Yellow-spotted Rock Hyrax) and three species of Tree Hyrax. Each type of Hyrax is in a different genus and, while physically similar, the genera have very different traits such as dental structure and reproductive anatomy. Although all look like rodents, they are, surprisingly, related to elephants, elephant shrews and sea cows.
Bush Hyrax
Bush Hyrax
The Bush Hyrax is native to bush, savannah and rocky habitats of a large part of eastern Africa. It is the smallest of the hyraxes.
Bush Hyrax
Bush Hyrax
The Bush Hyrax is also called Bruce's Yellow-spotted Hyrax. It is clearly not yellow-spotted (does not have yellow spots, except its eyebrows) but it is "yellow spotted" (without hyphen) since the under fur (and sometimes all fur) has a yellow tinge - more so on some of the many subspecies - and the rump or body can have spots - more visible on some individuals than on others. However the name is said to relate to a gland on the back that secrets a yellowish (sometimes reddish) substance.
Bush Hyrax with tail "I've got a tail"
Bush Hyrax
Bush Hyrax putting tongue out Putting tongue out
Like elephants, Rock Hyraxes have flattened, hoof-like toenails at the end of their foot instead of the slender toes and claws of rodents. They share several other physical traits with elephants and sea cows, such as tusks from incisor teeth rather than canine teeth.
Bush Hyrax
Bush Hyrax
Bush Hyrax
Female and young hyraxes live in family groups with a dominant male; bachelor males are solitary. Foraging in groups, like meerkats, they have a look-out to sound an alarm for predators and care for each others' young.