Sinaloan Milk Snake Lampropeltis triangulum sinaloae

Sinaloan Milk Snake
Sinaloan Milk Snake
There are a couple of dozen subspecies of the Milk Snake (Lampropeltis triangulum), which themselves are species of King Snake (so called since they eat other snake species). The Sinaloan is native to northwestern Mexico. The name Milk Snake derives from a myth that they suck milk from cows at night since they are active at night around barns - but in fact they prey on mice and rats there. They can reach nearly 3 feet long (1 metre).

Pueblan Milk Snake Lampropeltis triangulum campbelli

Pueblan Milk Snake
Pueblan Milk Snake
The Pueblan, also called Campbell's Milk Snake, is native to southern Mexico. Milk Snakes are not venomous and are harmless to humans but several of them look similar to the highly venomous Coral Snakes that also tend to have red and black banding (often with yellow warning colour rather than white). This is known as Batesian mimicry and the confusion is intended in nature to protect them from predators. However, in the human world, it has the opposite effect, since many are killed in the mistaken belief they are venomous.