Brow-antlered Deer Rucervus/Panolia eldii

Brow-antlered Deer
Brow-antlered Deer
Brow-antlered Deer
The Brow-antlered Deer, also called Eld's Deer, has 3 subspecies, all rare and endangered. Shown is the Burmese Brow-antlered Deer, R/P. e. thamin, also called the Thamin, native to Myanmar and western Thailand. The Manipuri Brow-antlered (nominal subspecies) is native to Manipur, India and the Thai Brow-antlered (siamensis) is native to China and Indo-china and sometimes considered a distinct species.
Brow-antlered Deer
Brow-antlered Deer
Brow-antlered Deer
A medium-sized deer, it is related to the Swamp Deer and Pere David's Deer and can reach some 4 feet at the shoulder. Its name comes from the huge antlers of the stags which can be some 2 metres long and are curved over the brow with especially long front branches over the forehead. They are re-grown each year.
Brow-antlered Deer
Brow-antlered Deer
Brow-antlered Deer
The coat is redder in summer and browner in winter. Female (hinds) don't have antlers. The deer are mostly solitary but the females gather in herds for the breeding season and males rut (fight) to mate with a harem/herd.