Waterbucks Kobus sp.

Common Waterbuck male
Common Waterbuck female
Common Waterbuck female
There are six species of "Kobus" Waterbucks, all African water-/marsh-loving antelopes. Male Waterbucks are larger than females, often darker and have large horns. An oily secretion waterproofs their legs. Above and immediately below is the Common Waterbuck, Kobus ellipsiprymnus, native to south and central Africa.
Common Waterbuck
Common Waterbuck
Common Waterbuck
There are two subspecies of Common Waterbuck, which interbreed where ranges overlap. Above is Kobus ellipsiprymnus ellipsen, with its distinctive and comical pale circle on its bottom.
Common Waterbuck male
Common Waterbuck male
Common Waterbuck female
The Common Waterbuck above is Kobus ellipsiprymnus defassa. It comes from central Africa (west to east sub-Sahara) and does not have the white circle on its rump but has a white bottom.
  
Lechwe Waterbuck female
Red Lechwe female
Southern Lechwe Waterbuck female
The Lechwe Waterbuck, Kobus leche, also called the Southern Lechwe or just Lechwe, is native to southern Africa. They generally live in large, single-sex herds. There are three subspecies. Shown above is the female of the nominal Red Lechwe subspecies.
Lechwe Waterbuck female
Lechwe Waterbuck female
White Southern Lechwe Waterbuck male
Although called the Red Lechwe, some have a white gene. The white variant is unlikely to live for long in the wild.
Lechwe Waterbuck male Male of nominal subspecies Red Lechwe
Lechwe Waterbuck male Herd of males (Red Lechwe)
Lechwe Waterbuck male Vulnerable Kafue Flats flood plain subspecies from Zambia
The male Lechwe has large, upward-curved horns. In addition to three living subspecies, another two are recently extinct; the extinctions are mainly due to hunting for "sport" and horns.
  
Nile Lechwe male
Nile Lechwes
Nile Lechwe male
The Nile Lechwe, Kobus megaceros, is native to Nile flood plains of Sudan and Ethiopia. Above is a male (left), with females and young male (centre) and juvenile male (right). Survival of this species, like other Waterbucks, is endangered by habitat loss and trophy hunting.