Rock Hyrax Procavia capensis

Rock Hyrax with babies
Rock Hyrax
There are two species of Rock Hyrax (the Rock/Cape Hyrax and the Yellow-spotted Rock Hyrax) and two species of Tree Hyrax. Although all look like rodents, they are surprisingly related to elephants, elephant shrews and sea cows. The Rock Hyrax, whose genus name "procavia" refers to its resemblance to the (rock) cavy or a large guinea pig, comes from rocky habitats of Africa (mainly sub-Saharan) and Arabia.
Rock Hyrax
Rock Hyrax
Rock Hyrax
Like elephants, Rock Hyraxes have flattened, hoof-like toenails at the end of their foot instead of the slender toes and claws of rodents. They share several other physical traits with elephants and sea cows, such as tusks from incisor teeth rather than canine teeth.
Rock Hyrax
Rock Hyrax
Rock Hyrax
Female and young hyraxes live in family groups with a dominant male; bachelor males are solitary. Foraging in groups, like meerkats, they have a look-out to sound an alarm for predators.
Rock Hyrax
Rock Hyrax
Rock Hyrax
Like some primates and dolphins/whales, Rock Hyraxes have a complex vocabulary whereby different calls and sounds represent specific dangers, predators, social interactions, etc.
Rock Hyrax
Rock Hyrax
Rock Hyrax