Helmeted Guinea Fowl Numida meleagris

Helmeted Guinea Fowl
Helmeted Guinea Fowl
Helmeted Guinea Fowl
All Guinea Fowl are native to Africa but the Helmeted Guinea Fowl from sub-Saharan Africa has been domesticated and introduced to other countries. The wild bird has a blue, unfeathered head with red wattle and a helmet-like horn on the top, usually larger in the males. The plumage is dark with an intricate pattern of pearls and mesh. They form fairly monogamous pairs in small flocks.
Helmeted Guinea Fowl
Helmeted Guinea Fowl
Plumage of Helmeted Guinea Fowl
They do not come from Equatorial Guinea but "Guinea" was a name given to mean from an exotic, far away place, like "Turkey" for the North American bird (which has the Greek for Guinea Fowl, meleagris, in its scientific name) and "Muscovy" for the South American duck. The domesticated fowl often have white faces rather than blue and sometimes lose the white spots on their plumage.
Double-headed Guinea Fowl
Double-headed Guinea Fowl Rare double-headed Guinea Fowl!
Helmeted Guinea Fowl The Guinea Fowl that swapped its feet with a Little Egret.
Helmeted Guinea Fowl
Helmeted Guinea Fowl
Helmeted Guinea Fowl
In addition to producing meat that is said to resemble turkey with pheasant, if free range they are efficient at controlling ticks, lice and ants and, like geese, they are noisy watch-dogs.
Helmeted Guinea Fowl
Helmeted Guinea Fowl
Helmeted Guinea Fowl
In addition to a love of ticks and lice, they also eat seeds, small reptiles and small mammals.
Guinea Fowl on road
why did the guinea fowl cross the roadLike chickens, Guinea Fowl have a tendency to cross roads.