Wigeon/Widgeon also Eurasian Wigeon Anas penelope

Wigeon
Eurasian Wigeon
Widgeon
The Wigeon (archaic spelling Widgeon), also called the Eurasian Wigeon to distinguish it from the related American Wigeon, is prevalent in northern Europe and Asia. It is also an occasional vagrant to North America where it will mix with flocks of American Wigeon and can interbreed; occasionally the reverse is true, and American Wigeon vagrants or escapees can be found in flocks of Eurasian Wigeon. The third species of Wigeon, the South American Chiloe Wigeon, is also related.
Wigeon
Eurasian Wigeon
Widgeon
The (Eurasian) Wigeon drake (above) has a russet head and neck and a pinky white centre crown; he does not have the metallic green on the side of the face that its American counterpart has. He has a well-defined break between his pink breast and grey sides. He has a black-tipped, blue-grey bill, a white belly, black rump and a green wing speculum. His eclipse plumage is similar to that of the female.
Widgeon
Wigeon
Wigeon
Wigeon
Wigeon Eurasian female
Wigeon female
The (Eurasian) Wigeon female (above) looks a little similar to female mallards and teals but can be distinguished by her black-tipped, small, blue-grey bill and russet sides. She is almost identical to the female American Wigeon but has a darker head (and some white on the under-wings).
Confusingly, the female Wigeon also has a GREY MORPH (lacking the warm russet tones) but the source refers only to a grey head . . .
. . . and a RUFOUS MORP (lacking the grey tones), again referring only to a more reddish head.
However, the drake in eclipse plumage has a more rufous total plumage, as shown immediately above.